Do We Recognize Our Privilege? Another Look at the DREAM Act (by Guest Blogger Oscar Ramirez)

I was able to watch a short documentary on the DREAM act and see the situations that Alejandra, the undocumented student in the documentary, had to go through and continues to struggle with because of her legal status. This film hit me personally as a Latino in the United States. And I personally know people that have had and have the same obstacles as Alejandra. I consider myself very fortunate because I have been presented with all the opportunities and rights this country has to offer because I was born here in the US. However, for millions of people that should have the equal treatment as human beings, they cannot live a life without fear of deportation and being separated from their families.

This film I think is very insightful into the world of the “DREAMers” and how this act will bring so many positive things to the lives for these students. I am a first generation college student in my family and even with all the rights I from this country it was difficult for me to know how to get into college and let alone pay for it. Simple things such as being able to work legally to make a little money during school, or having a license to be able to drive, or being able to open a bank account have helped me tremendously during my education. These simple things perhaps are taken for granted by most citizens and these simple things are items that undocumented students could possibly never have in their life if something is not done to help them. Thinking about our own lives and placing ourselves in the shoes of an undocumented, would it be possible for you to function in the US if you could not have these simple privileges?

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2 thoughts on “Do We Recognize Our Privilege? Another Look at the DREAM Act (by Guest Blogger Oscar Ramirez)

  1. Oscar,
    I haven’t seen the movie you watched, but it sounds like it gives some valuable insight on just how the lives of these kids trying to benefit from the Dream Act are. It reminds us that these are real people trying to make the most of a difficult situation they were born into.

    I think that you bring up a good point when you mention the “simple things such as being able to work legally to make a little money during school, or having a license to be able to drive, or being able to open a bank account”. These are things that seem so basic and are often taken for granted, but not having them would just create more discouraging barriers in the path of trying to build a better future.

    Thank you for your post, I want to see this movie now!
    Zelda Burk

  2. Oscar,
    As a white male I feel that you are absolutely right. I think that many of us take for granted things that make life what it is. Then, if they were taken away we would realize how difficult it, life, becomes. If we took your advice and put ourselves in their shoes maybe the folks that are against these students’ success might get past the fact “it’s not fair they get special treatment.” When in fact what is so special about wanting to become all that we can be. I am sure that is what they want for their children.
    In listening to a conversation on OPB, two males, who were against students of undocumented workers getting in-state tuition, based their arguements on fairness. These two white men (I presume) do not know what unfair feels like and neither do I. The world is wide open to us, but for these students this is far from the truth.
    Does anyone else feel that basing an arguement on “fairness” shows how unfair our system actually is to others?

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