How the Common Core and National Standards Further the “Achievement Gap” (by Char Ashley)

CharDefining “Achievement Gap” and Other Educational Disparities

Achievement Gap refers to the different disparities among academic performance between groups of students.

International Achievement Gap refers to the different disparities among academic performance between groups of students in other industrial nations.

Racial Achievement Gap refers to racial and ethnic inequalities in education.

Income Achievement Gap refers to disparities between high and low-income pupils in education.

System-Based Achievement Gap refers to disparities among educational programs (Common Core) in schools.

Questions to Consider

  1. How does the Common Core impact the Achievement Gap?
  2. Why doesn’t the US provide more support for school who are not meeting the national standards?
  3. What can be done in order to close the Achievement Gap?

The Achievement Gap, Common Core and National Standards

Let’s continue our conversation from last week about the Common Core and National Standards by discussing the Achievement Gap among students, states and nations. With a nation as diverse as the US, one standardized test can not effectively diagnose pupils knowledge accurately. In my opinion, the Common Core standards are standards that set white, middle to high class, pupils up for success but fail to adhere to pupils of color. In the Stanford article, socioeconomic disparities directly correlate with the Racial Achievement Gap, families with higher income and higher education are able to provide their children with more education opportunities. Additionally, people of color on average tend to come from families with lower income and lower education, which puts them at risk for falling short academically (falling in line with statistics). So often we criticize and demoralize families who are struggling, when instead we should be a more empathetic culture and provide support for those who need it.

What can be done to erase the achievement gap among white pupils and pupils of color? In the article by Chavous, he brings forth a good point , if we are looking to fix our economy, we can do so by first fixing our education. It is an inevitable fact that children are the future and if we can create equity among all pupils that will subsequently result in a more successful economy. Likewise, by removing the punishment involved in low standardized test scores put in place by the Common Core, we could instead provide schools with the necessary tools and resources to promote a better quality educational experience for both educators and pupils. Furthermore, creating diverse materials and strategies for instruction would facilitate a more diverse learning environment and increase pupil productivity.

Stanford Article: http://cepa.stanford.edu/educational-opportunity-monitoring-project/achievement-gaps/race/

Chavous Article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kevin-p-chavous/if-you-want-our-economy-f_b_1700195.html

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2 thoughts on “How the Common Core and National Standards Further the “Achievement Gap” (by Char Ashley)

  1. Thanks again for a thoughtful post. I appreciate your emphasis on removing the punishment involved in low standardized tests. What tends to be forgotten is that low standardized tests are often because these schools are already suffering to begin with. They lack adequate resources, funding, and assistance/support to be able to garner high standardized test scores. In reality, these schools are already being punished by the lack of resources. It makes no sense to punish them more. Instead of determining how much funding a school should get by these scores, we should use the scores to determine what school needs extra support.

  2. Thank RJ! I agree that schools who are under preforming are already suffering in other ways, whether that is lack or resources, socioeconomic factors, etc. I really do believe that there is a better way to go about addressing schools who are not meeting national standards. Taking away funding is definitely not the correct approach and hasn’t proven to be an effective way to get students/schools to improve scores but caused many schools to shut down due to lack of funding.

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