How the Common Core and National Standards Further the “Achievement Gap” (by Char Ashley)

Defining “Achievement Gap” and Other Educational Disparities Achievement Gap refers to the different disparities among academic performance between groups of students. International Achievement Gap refers to the different disparities among academic performance between groups of students in other industrial nations. … Continue reading

Restorative Justice in a Nutshell (by Randee-Jo Barcinas-Manglona )

What is justice? It sounds pretty self-explanatory, right? Justice is about being fair and reasonable. We all know that. When someone commits a crime, justice gets served to them in court. We put people in jail as punishment for violating … Continue reading

The Good and the Bad of Testing Standards (by Jessica Urbina)

We all know that testing makes up a big part of how a public school are funded and at times the testing difficulty can impact the average scores of each school. When the testing standard is different in each state, … Continue reading

Supporting Families Within the PSU Community by Encouraging High-Quality Family Time—In Cooperation with PSU’s Resource Center for Students with Children (by Vee Mangual, Josh Mannion, Aleina Langford, Angela Haluska, and Roya Afghan Haji Abbasi

  Our group has five members—and two of us are student-parents. We understand all too well how the community does and does not support families. One of the most precious resources to any busy student is TIME, and that resource … Continue reading

To Infinity and Beyond!

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How can social movements move our society towards educational equity?

How can we as students, use what we have learned to impact the racial/social/economic injustices that hinder our schools and prevent them from moving past mediocrity?

Public policy, classroom discussion, and even grassroots movements can sometimes fall short on action. Everyone knows that something needs to change. Some of us can even agree as to what needs to change, but this week we discuss what that looks like in action, beyond our classroom.

With discussions on how to narrow the achievement/opportunity gap in our minds, there are some challenges our public schools are facing. Here are some things that most movements/individuals can agree are necessary to school success and vitality.

1. Access to quality teachers.

2. Access to safe and equitable resources

3. Equitable and sufficient funding for ALL schools

 4. Reform that creates early intervention and encourages active, hands on learning.

    1. 5. Ensure equal opportunity to high school graduation and college participation to all students regardless of their background.

How can we use what we have learned to support these principles?

Help fund our schools by voting!

Voting and passing legislation that supports school funding is vital.

Tell people why voting is vital for better schools. A friend of mine recently complained that her sons school was really lacking in hands on learning and her son was struggling to stay focused. She doesn’t vote and doesn’t know where our money for schools comes from (I didn’t either!).

Discussion outside of class and our school peers will be important to education movement.

 

Information on funding through tax dollars here. 

Talk! Talk! Talk!

With your neighbors, your local politicians, your educators, community members, the list goes on! Open a discussion to get people thinking about their values and the future of their community.

Don’t know where to start? Here are some links to give you encouragement!

Get caught up on the latest education news here.

Some more news.

Get involved!

Actively participate in your community. It helps. It is seen by others. The results can be life changing for some.

General volunteer match up.

Volunteer at PPS

More volunteering

Finally, look inward. Are there bias’s, privileges, or other values you hold that could be excluding some the right to equitable education? It’s hard to look at our beliefs in this way, but who knows how valuable it could be!

Are you privileged?

Be aware

I think the key is to keep moving forward. Keep asking questions. Keep expanding your ideas and your tools.

What will you do to move to a more equitable education system?

– Tracy